10 lesser-known driving offences you need to be aware of

Driving with pets

Do you know you’re committing an offence if you drive with a dirty number plate or an unsecured pet in your car?

To stop you being inadvertently hit with some hefty fines and penalty points, we’re giving you the lowdown on 10 lesser-known driving offences and the heavy consequences they come with.

  1. Driving with snow on your roof

We all hate having to scrape snow and ice off our cars in the bitterly-cold winter mornings, but it has to be done. If you drive with snow on your roof, it could slide down onto your windscreen and obscure your view, meaning you’re putting your life and the lives of your passengers at risk.

You can be fined £60 and get three penalty points for this one.

  1. Dirty number plate

Your number plate has to be visible at all times – if it can’t be read, or if your number plate light isn’t working at night, you’ll be fined up to £1,000 under the Road Vehicles Regulations 2001.

  1. Obstructing emergency services

Failure to get out of the way for emergency services to pass can land you with a fine of up to £5,000. Don’t forget that you’re also open to a fine if you break the law to clear the way for emergency services (unless police officers have said you can do so).

  1. Splashing pedestrians

Splashing pedestrians with puddles while driving, intentionally or unintentionally, can lead to a fine of up to £5,000 (a £100 fine is common) for not paying consideration to other road users.

  1. Driving with unsecured pets in the car

Pets can distract you while driving, so this offence comes with a £100 fixed penalty fine and three points, but courts can increase this to £5,000 and nine penalty points if they see fit.

  1. Flashing headlights

If you notice a police car waiting to go after those who are speeding, and you warn drivers by flashing your headlights, you could be obstructing the police and can get a fine of up to £1,000.

  1. Driving without your glasses

Do you need to wear glasses while you drive? If yes, it should say so on your driving licence. If you fail to wear your glasses you can get a £100 fixed penalty fine, which can increase to £1,000, and up to six penalty points.

  1. Using an unsecured phone or sat-nav

You want to make sure your phone or sat-nav is in a proper holder and mounted in a way that doesn’t obstruct your full view of the road.

If you don’t do this, you can get three penalty points and a fine of up to £1,000.

  1. Beeping your horn

It’s an offence to beep your car horn if you’re stationary in traffic, or on a road with streetlights and a 30mph limit between the hours of 11.30pm and 7am – you can get a fine up to £1,000.

  1. Failing to update your address

Moved house recently? Don’t forget to update your address and other details on your driving licence otherwise you might get fined up to £1,000.

What are the rules on travelling with pets? Read to find out.

7 Comments

  1. Lawrence says:

    Knew a lot of them and there’s new law coming in about mobile phone using them to photo things when driving as that wasn’t covered by the law but changing shortly

  2. Steve Lawton says:

    How can No.6 be deemed as obstructing the police? Surely you are helping to stop an offence being committed which is surely the idea of what the police are there for in the first place?

  3. Margaret owusu says:

    Thanks for letting me know these new laws will keep everyone updated

  4. nader says:

    what charge could I get passing by a 30 mile limit in a safe and quaite road by 8 miles over

    thanks

  5. Glyn Jones says:

    Thank you for the information it was very helpful.

  6. Nikolay Bachiyski says:

    Good

  7. Ioan Dolhescu says:

    Also, I heard that if you are a passenger in front sit ,you can’t use the phone ,is that true?

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